Tag Archives: Ivory

Call on Japan to Ban Ivory Trade

WildlifeDirect recently became aware of the scale of laundering of illegal ivory in the ivory markets of Japan through its contact with the Japanese NGO Tears of the African Elephant. Please see more about the interview we did on NTV Wild via this link:https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Cvsj21F_FI4 . We have joined forces with other conservation organizations in Africa and Japan to take the opportunity provided by the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD) conference happening here in Nairobi, Kenya to publish a joint appeal to Japan to ban all trade in ivory trade, following the lead of China and the USA.

Japan is one of Africa’s most important development partners. They have made major contributions and commitments to support conservation. Now the conservation community call for 5 actions to be agreed at TICAD:

  1. Japan to permanently close legal domestic markets of ivory, and aggressively close down online trading sites that deal in ivory, all to crush demand.
  2. Japan to suspend ivory registration immediately, to prevent loopholes that allow fraudulent registration and laundering of illegal ivory.
  3. Japan to support the Elephant Protection Initiative.
  4. Japan to strengthen cooperation on elephant conservation initiatives and combating the trafficking of ivory to Japan through joint investigations and mutual legal assistance.
  5. Japan’s Prime Minister and First Lady to jointly issue statements to discourage the selling and buying of ivory in Japan and to initiate an education and outreach campaign to Japanese citizens on the importance of saving elephants by stopping poaching and ending ivory trade.

We urge Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta, who is the head of the Giants Club of African presidents supporting elephant conservation, and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinz? Abe, to seize this unique opportunity at TICAD6 to discuss the issue as part of their duty towards the development agendas of Africa and Japan.

We also urge the H.E. the First Lady of Japan, Akie Abe, an ardent conservationist, to join H.E. the First Lady of Kenya, Margaret Kenyatta in raising awareness about elephants and their conservation needs.

You can access the English and Japanese versions of the joint statement here: Joint Statement-TICAD6

 

 

 

 

Notorious Kenyan Ivory Trafficker Jailed for 20 Years and Fined USD 200,000

On Friday, a Mombasa law court sentenced Feisal Mohamed Ali to 20 years in jail after finding him guilty of illegal possession of ivory worth 44 million shillings (US $440,000). The court also imposed a fine of 20 million shillings.

This landmark ruling by the Kenyan court is the end of a long story that began with the seizure of 2 tonnes of ivory at Fuji Motors car yard in Mombasa in June 2014.

Read more about this story on The Guardian

Calling the World to help save African Elephants

 

African Elephants

 

WildlifeDirect supports the African Elephant Coalition (AEC) in the call to the world to help save African elephants.

As an organization that has been in the forefront calling for a total ban on all ivory trade, WildlifeDirect urges other African countries not represented at the meeting held in Montreux, Switzerland from 24 to 26 June 2016 to join AEC in this call to save the our iconic species that are in danger of extinction if nothing is done.

In a press release by AEC, 29 member states call on all governments, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations for their support, and calls on citizens around the world to ask their respective governments and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) representatives to support the five proposals and to help the Coalition in its mission to list all elephants in Appendix I.

The Coalition of 29 African member states submitted to CITES five proposals designed to reverse the poaching crisis facing elephants and to put an end to the ivory trade to afford elephants the highest protection under international law.

The five proposals are:

  1. Listing all elephants in CITES Appendix I
  1. Closure of domestic ivory markets
  1. Ivory stockpile destruction and management
  1. The Decision-Making Mechanism for a process of trade in ivory (DMM)
  1. Restricting trade in live elephants

AEC agreed to launch a social media campaign in a bid to gain support for the five proposals to the 17th Conference of the Parties (CoP17) of CITES in September-October in Johannesburg, South Africa. We invite you to use the hashtags #WorthMoreAlive, #EndIvoryTrade and #Vote4Elephants to support the campaign.

Speaking at the meeting in Montreux, Bourama Niagaté from Mali, a member of the Council of the Elders for the Coalition noted that there was need for all relevant stakeholders to pull together for the sake of Africa’s elephants.

Kenya, a member state of AEC has taken a zero tolerance approach to poaching and ivory trafficking.

In April this year, Kenya took a bold step in burning 105 tons of ivory and 1.5 tons of rhino horn. This is reportedly the world’s largest stockpile of elephant ivory and rhino horns ever to be burnt. The historic burn demonstrated Kenya’s commitment to seeking a total global ban of ivory and rhino horns.

Speaking at the burn, President Uhuru Kenyatta said, “by destroying ivory we declare once and for all that our national heritage is not for sale”. The only value that ivory has is tusks on a live elephant.

It is this commitment from the highest level of government and collaboration with conservationists and law enforcement that has seen Kenya achieve 80 percent reduction in deaths of elephants in the last three years.

 

You can download the Press Release Here

WildlifeDirect’s 2nd Courtroom Monitoring Report 2014 & 2015

A study by WildlifeDirect of wildlife trials in 18 courts between 2008 and 2013 concluded that Kenya was a safe haven for wildlife criminals because of major weaknesses in the legal chain. This second study examines progress made in the wildlife trials in Kenya in 2014 and 2015, after the enactment of the Wildlife Conservation and Management Act, 2013 (WCMA 2013)

CMR

Here is the link to the full report

WildlifeDirect Courtroom Monitoring Report(1)

Kenyan Government Issues a 21 Day Amnesty on Ivory and Wildlife Trophies

The Kenyan government has issued a 21 day amnesty for the surrender of any wildlife trophy without Kenya Wildlife Service permit. Those who take advantage of the amnesty, which took effect from March 30, 2016 will not be punished. Speaking during the launch of site preparations for the historic burning of elephant ivory and rhino horns, Cabinet Secretary for Environment and Regional Development, Prof.  Judi Wakhungu said, “Anybody holding any ivory, rhino horns or any other wildlife trophies, jewellery or trinkets to surrender to the KWS Director General at the KWS headquarters. The items can also be surrendered to the Assistant Directors at KWS regional offices in Mombasa, Voi, Nyeri, Marsabit, Nakuru, Kitale and Meru National Park.”

 

Prof. Wakhungu stated that the government of Kenya, led by President Uhuru Kenyatta will on April 30, 2016 set ablaze the world’s largest stockpile of elephant ivory and rhino horns ever to be burnt. The government has attached great significance to this State event and to this end, the president has invited dignitaries from all over the world who will come to express solidarity with Kenyans in conservation efforts. Although the destruction of ivory and rhino horns will not in itself put an end to the illegal trade in these items, it demonstrates Kenya’s commitment to seeking a total global ban of ivory and rhino horns.

 

Speaking to the media at the same event, our Chief Executive Officer Dr. Paula Kahumbu also emphasized the importance of not attaching economic use to ivory and rhino horns. WildlifeDirect continues to work towards change of hearts, minds and laws to protect elephants. Our current campaign dubbed HandsOffOurElephants focuses on raising awareness and political support to stop poaching, trafficking and buying of ivory.

 

As a build up to the upcoming Ivory and Rhino Horn Burn, WildlifeDirect is working in collaboration with other partners including KWS and USAID to hold a Conservation Media event that will rally people around the globe to make commitments to act to save the elephants and rhinos.

 

Prof. Wakhungu further stated that the poaching of elephants and rhinos and illegal wildlife trade continues to be a major problem in Africa and threatens the very survival of these iconic species. Poaching is facilitated by international criminal syndicates and fuels corruption. It is important for the public to know that the poaching undermines the rule of law and funds other criminal activities that not only harm local communities but also national economies.

 

In the past three years, Kenya has redoubled its efforts and put measures in combating elephant poaching and illegal trade in elephant ivory within and across its boarders. In 2014, 164 elephants were poached in the country which significantly reduced to 96 elephants in 2015. Also in 2014, 35 rhinos were illegally killed compared to 11 in 2015. Another key milestone that was highlighted was the national audit of the stockpile of ivory and rhinoceroses horn for enhance monitoring and management purpose. The audit recorded 135.8 tonnes of elephant ivory and 1.5 tonnes of rhino horns.

Leakey interview in SWARA and on NTV Wild Talk at 10 pm

NTV Wild Talk, broadcast an interview with Richard Leakey about the past and the present for wildlife and heritage in Kenya. It aired on Tuesday March 15 on NTV at 10 pm.
I also want to draw attention to the new article in SWARA here  in which he states

“Parks will only be sustainable if Kenyans want them to be sustainable. Middle class Kenyans who own TV sets watch international soccer, international vanity shows and news but none of them watch wildlife programmes because they’ve never been put on air in this country.”

Richard Leakey

This sentiment is the reason that we created NTV Wild. For those who have not been able to catch previous episodes, NTV Wild is a partnership between NTV, WildlifeDirect and KWS to broadcast wildlife documentaries made in Kenya and Africa on national Television for the first time in our history to inspire Kenyans to visit our parks and appreciate our spectacular wildlife heritage. The program airs on Saturdays and a discussion program on Tuesdays.
This is the list of all the NTV Wild documentaries so far on Saturday’s at 8 pm
1. Mzima Haunt of the River Horse – Mark Deeble and Vicky Stone
2. The Last Lions – Derek and Beverly Joubert
3. African Cats – DisneyNature
4. Here be Dragons – Alan Root
5. Battle For the Elephants – Nat Geo
6. The Queen of Trees – Mark Deeble and Vicky Stone
NTV Wild Talk on Tuesdays at 10 pm

 

Launching the series with Jonathan Scott

 

NTV Wild Talk S1 E1 “The mystery of Mzima”

 NTV Wild Talk S1 E2 “Kenya-US relations in protecting wildlife”

NTV Wild Talk S1 E3 “Stopping wildlife trafficking through Kenya”

NTV Wild Talk S1 E4 “Saving Kenya’s big cats”

NTV Wild Talk S1 E5 “Safeguarding Karura Forest”

 

TV Wild Talk S1 E6 “Wildlife Newbies & Champions”

In this episode: Kitili Mbathi shares the challenges & successes at KWS, Lena Munge tells of how she hopes to transform the Masai Mara, Najib Balala explains why he jumped off a plane for conservation & 12 yr old Luca Berardi stresses the importance of wildlife for future generations.

Both the documentaries and the talk shows have been trending on twitter since we began 7 weeks ago and people are telling us that they are setting their alarm clocks to catch the programs. We are already on week 7 and we have 45 more  to go! Enjoy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#NTVWild panel discussion: Understanding the wild in Kenya with Jonathan Scott

It was a pleasure to listen and watch Jonathan Scott LIVE in studio. Many have watched him on Big Cat Diaries but few have ever met him. Along with Dr. Paula Kahumbu, WildlifeDirect CEO and Paula Mbugua from KWS, they talked about the new series #NTVWild that Premieres on NTV KENYA on Saturday January 16, 2016

Watch the discussion here:

 

 

 

NTV WILD Season Premiere on 16th January 2016

We are proud to announce the official premier of NTV Wild, a partnership between NTV one of Kenya’s premier broadcasters, WildlifeDirect and the Kenya Wildlife Service.

NTV Wild is a partnership between NTV, KWS and WildlifeDirect. The first ever broadcasting of the Award winning wildlife documentaries made in Kenya and Africa every Saturday.

We will awaken your sense of awe and wonder at our magnificent wildlife heritage, which you own and have a responsibility for protecting.

Help us save it. Visit our magnificent parks, and take actions against anything that threatens our protected areas, wildlife spectacles, wild landscapes and endangered species.

Tune in every Saturday (from the 16th of January) at 8 pm. Share this widely through your networks and on social media using the hasthag NTVWild
We look forward to your feed back

 

Hong Kong ivory trader admits to corruption and smuggling of ivory ahead of motion in Hong Kong parliament to restrict ivory trade and strengthen the anti-trafficking efforts

embedded by Embedded Video
Download Video

 

Hong Kong ivory trader admits to corruption and smuggling of ivory ahead of motion in Hong Kong parliament to restrict ivory trade and strengthen the anti-trafficking efforts

We hope that this footage persuades Hong Kong Legislators to support Elizabeth Quat’s motion. Hong Kong Motion

VIDEO: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE

ELEPHANT IVORY TRADE

BY KIRSTEN HORNE NOVEMBER 26 2015
Africa is in the midst of a poaching crisis. This we know. Tens of thousands of elephants are being killed for their tusks each year, feeding a demand for ivory on the other side of the world in Asia.

But how did we get here? Not that long ago, the continent’s elephant populations appeared to be recovering after years of slaughter, as a ban on international trade in ivory trade took effect. Now, the poachers are back with a vengeance. In this video, we take an in-depth look at why the demand for ivory has sky-rocketed, how the illegal wildlife trade is a threat to global security and what is being done to save Africa’s elephants from extinction.

https://youtu.be/93rRwxSsDPQ

 

In my ongoing efforts to learn more about this poaching pandemic, I had the privilege of meeting and interviewing Dr Paula Kahumbu, CEO of WildlifeDirect, who spearheads the “Hands off our Elephants” campaign in Kenya. She’s a passionate, high-profile advocate in the fight to end the illegal ivory trade.

We spoke of the many complex issues that have helped to shape this unfolding disaster, but we also talked of the elephants themselves, and what Kahumbu has learned about these magnificent animals.

Interview Paula Kahumba_2014_09_23

Interviewing Paula Kahumba. Image: Wokshots

These are, after all, highly intelligent creatures. They’re long-lived; they display close familial bonds; they mourn their dead. This is no doubt why we find it is so uniquely disturbing to see them poached on such a vast scale.

For Kahumbu, perhaps the biggest blow came in 2014, when poachers in Kenya killed the iconic “big tusker” known to the world as Satao, one of the world’s few remaining elephants with tusks big enough to almost touch the ground.

In the outpouring of sadness that followed the death, those who had known the legendary giant claimed that a lifetime of evading poachers had taught Satao, who had survived a previous attack, to not only fear strangers, but also some awareness that it was his tusks that put him in danger.

“He didn’t just know he was in danger. He did something that was so surprising. When people were near him he would turn his face and look into the bush. He would actually hide his tusks. He spent his whole life knowing that he was in danger because of his tusks,” Kahumbu told me. “For filmmakers he was a real problem because here was this magnificent animal that would not face the camera.”

satao_elephant_GalleryLarge

Satao was one of very few ‘big tuskers’ left in Kenya. Image: Tsavo Trust

While we can only speculate about Satao’s behaviour, evidence continues to emerge of just how tuned in elephants are to humans and the potential danger we pose to them. In some parts of Africa, studies have shown they are capable of picking up on cues such as scent, clothing colour, language and even tone of voice.

“When elephants hear certain tribes-people who are known to be hunters, they behave in a certain way. They bunch up. They protect the most vulnerable individuals in the middle. They face out in a very defensive position,” Kahumbu said.

We’re also learning more about their sophisticated means of communicating that danger to other members of the herd.

“When an elephant is injured or hears a gunshot, they respond and can communicate that fear to each other. We’ve seen this. Their vocalisations are sub-sonic, so we cannot hear them, but we can record them and play them back and see how the elephants behave. They have a call that’s ‘let’s go’. They have a call that’s ‘let’s meet up later at a certain place’. They have calls that are ‘back off or stay away’.”

For Kahumbu, there is much we still have to learn about elephant intelligence, but what we know so far serves only to underscore their immense value. “They are the identity of Africa, but they are also global monuments.”

Kirsten Horne

KIRSTEN HORNE

KIRSTEN HORNE IS EARTH TOUCH’S ONLINE PRODUCER AND SCRIPTWRITER. SOME PEOPLE MIGHT CALL HER BOSSY, BUT SHE PREFERS TO THINK OF HERSELF AS FOCUSED AND PASSIONATE. SHE’S ALSO OBSESSED WITH WILDLIFE AND ANIMALS, AND IS A COMMITTED MISANTHROPIST.