Category Archives: wildlifedirect

WildlifeDirect Expresses dismay at decision to route SGR through Nairobi National Park

Nairobi-January 6, 2017: WildlifeDirect express deep dismay at the decision by the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) to grant approval for the Standard Gauge Railway (SGR) to pass through the Nairobi National park, despite overwhelming public opposition. The government has promised that the railway will not impede wildlife migrations, and that funds will be made available to improve the status of this and other parks in the country, while protecting the people who live adjacent to parks.

On December 13, 2016, NEMA issued a license giving Kenya Railways the go-ahead to construct SGR Phase 2A that will pass through the middle of Nairobi National Park on an elevated bridge.

The Park is Kenya’s oldest protected natural area and the only National Park in the world located within a major city.  It contains more biodiversity than many entire countries and is a sanctuary of global significance for some endangered species, notably the black rhinoceros. The Park is also a refuge from city life that provides incalculable benefits for millions of Nairobi residents, as well as for tourists and business visitors from all over the world.

On October 27, 2016 WildlifeDirect’s convened a forum bringing together stakeholders from many sectors, who were unanimous in calling on Kenya Railways to search for an alternative solution that would preserve the integrity of the Park. These efforts have fallen on deaf ears and the Park now faces an uncertain future.

The decision to route the railway through the Park not only goes against public opinion, but it also ignores the advice of numerous scientific experts who have warned of its irreversible consequences. Moreover it sets a very dangerous precedent for other Protected Areas in Kenya threatened by infrastructure projects, mining, and unregulated urban and agricultural expansion. It especially undermines the budding conservancy movement in which hundreds of Kenyans have invested their land in conservation.

To ensure that the railway has minimal impact, WildlifeDirect will be monitoring compliance on all the conditions of the license and laws of Kenya. Speaking on phone from London, Dr. Paula Kahumbu said, “While we acknowledge that infrastructure development is urgently required in Kenya, WildlifeDirect is concerned that it greatly amplifies threats to wildlife. We commit to supporting the efforts of the Government of Kenya and the Kenya Railways to ensure that they deliver in their promise of ensuring minimal environmental degradation impact of the Park, while improving the conservation status of wildlife across Kenya.”

In April 2016, Kenya’s conservation reputation received a boost when President Uhuru Kenyatta set aflame 105 tonnes of ivory. This historic event sent out a clear message that protecting our national heritage is more important than short-term economic gain. At this time of rapid economic growth for Africa, the challenge of protecting wildlife will increasingly require a well informed and engaged public, infrastructures that work, and the rule of law to be upheld. WildlifeDirect invites Kenyans from all walks of life to support environmentally friendly developments that protect our country’s unique natural heritage, and to report on any developments that are in violation of the country’s environmental policies.

 

For more information please contact: Patricia Sewe, Communications Manager

Email: [email protected]

Telephone: +254 (0)705-515709

Six reasons why Kenyans should save the Nairobi National Park

Today is the deadline for commenting on the environmental impact assessment of the proposal to route the Standard Gauge Railway (SGR) Phase II A through Nairobi National Park. I urge all citizens and people around the world who care about Nairobi Park to communicate their concerns to NEMA’s Director General Geoffrey Wahungu. Here’s why you should write now to demand that NEMA rejects Kenya Railways’ application to run a railway through Park:

  1. Nairobi National Park is a priceless national asset: The new rail line will be boon for the economy. Opponents of the route through the Park all agree that it should be built. Nairobi Park is also a boon for the economy, but it is much more than that. It is a symbol of our national identity and Kenya’s leadership of wildlife conservation in Africa, a wildlife sanctuary of global significance, and a unique and irreplaceable resource for the health, well-being and education of our citizens.
  2. We can’t take the risk: There are those who argue persuasively that the raised construction of railway will mitigate damage to the Park and safeguard its wildlife. But we simply can’t afford to take the risk—and we don’t have to, as there other viable routes available.
  3. Kenya’s reputation is at stake: Just a few months ago, the eyes of the world were on Kenya as President Kenyatta set fire to our ivory stockpiles and declared that elephants are “worth more alive”. This courageous stand was inspired by the understanding that our national heritage is more important than short-term economic expediency. Taking the wrong decision now will significantly damage Kenya’s international reputation as a world leader in conservation, and the image and name of our President as Africa’s number one champion for wildlife.
  4. It will set a dangerous precedent: This decision is about more than Nairobi Park, it is about our vision for the future of our continent. Allowing the railway to go through the Park will make it more difficult to defend all the other parks and reserves, forests and other areas of national heritage threatened by similar development projects. It will also set a precedent for the rest of Africa.
  5. It’s our democratic right and duty: This is about process as well as outcomes. Kenya has procedures and laws in place to regulate decisions about development projects. But governments will only respect these procedures if we, as citizens, show that we care and exercise our democratic right to take part in the process to demand that they do so.
  6. It’s for our grandchildren: As a signatory to the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change, Kenya is legally obliged to pursue forms of development that are compatible with environmental conservation. African nations have a duty to honour these commitments, in order to bequeath a healthy planet to future generations.

With the election of a climate change denier to the White House, it is clear that, in an increasingly uncertain world, Africans can no longer rely on others to fight our battles for us. It is our responsibility safeguard the future of the continent for our children and grandchildren. A courageous decision to adopt an alternative route will establish Kenya’s leadership of efforts to achieve sustainable development for Africa and its people, while protecting wildlife and the environment.

In the 70 years since the Park was gazetted, Nairobi residents have come to take it for granted, and it has been underused. But now and in the future it will be needed more than ever as a refuge from the frenetic pace and stress of city life. Now is not the time to cut the Park in two. We need a new plan for the Park that will transform it into a living resource for the benefit of all our citizens, as those who founded it intended it to be.

Today is the deadline for submitting comments to National Environment Management Authority – Kenya. Please write your note to [email protected] and cc [email protected] so that we can hand deliver a physical copy of your letter today (pls send before 2pm)

Down load template for writing letter here

This article by Dr. Paula Kahumbu was first published on the Daily Nation on 25th November 2016

 

Kenyans hold a dialogue on how best to achieve a balance between conservation and infrastructure development in SGR Phase 2A

group-shot

On 7th October, the Kenya Railways, Kenya Wildlife Service, and several conservation and research institutions agreed to hold a dialogue meeting on 27th October to address the question, “HOW CAN WE BEST ACHIEVE A BALANCE BETWEEN CONSERVATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN SGR PHASE 2A?”.

176 participants engaged in the one day discussion using the Open Space method which was facilitated by London based firm Public Service Works. Participants of the dialogue represented a cross section of stakeholders including industrialists, land owners, community, scientists, park managers, lawyers, conservationists, park users, tourism sector, railway engineers and others. Participants engaged in 17 different meetings and conversations for which the outcomes will be shared in a final report to be circulated this week. Eight major recommendations emerged all of which were urgent and important, and which can be broadly categorized into three groups.

  1. The participants all agreed that Kenya needs the Standard Gauge Railway as it will spur economic growth, poverty alleviation and bring great rewards to Kenya. However, there was overwhelming support that the SGR should not go through the Nairobi National Park which would destroy the park, damage the Presidents reputation as Africa’s greatest conservation champion, and set a dangerous precedent. They agreed that the conservation reputation of the President and the nation could not be compromised and that technical and financial solutions must be found to enable it to be re-routed so that Kenya could enjoy the benefits of both the Park and the SGR. This require engineers to work with the Kenya Railways to conduct technical assessments of alternative routes. Financial considerations to address the additional cost must be addressed.
  2.  Participants expressed great concern at the apparent non-compliance with Kenya’s laws and insisted that rule of law must prevail. They agreed that the construction of the SGR must be compliant with the laws of Kenya as well as regional legislation and other environmental commitments. This includes compliance with the Environmental Management and Coordination Act, 1999, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process, the Wildlife Act, the Constitution and Kenya’s commitments to bodies within United Nations such as the SDG’s. This includes ensuring that the construction of the SGR adheres to court orders.
  3. The participants agreed that a major communications campaign through the media houses was needed to promote better understanding and love of the Nairobi National Park and conservation in general. As a first step, they proposed that on 16 December 2016, a major celebration be held for the Park’s 70th birthday through school activities and involving Kenya’s First Lady.

As the convenor of the event, WildlifeDirect CEO said, “I was touched and moved by the level of engagement, the seriousness with which participants addressed the issues, the honesty and the willingness to challenge one another over such a contentious issue”. After the meeting began, it was revealed that the Kenya Railways had published their EIA report in the daily newspaper that morning. The failure of the Kenya Railways to inform the organizers so that this document could have informed the discussion was regrettable and caused huge disappointment amongst participants.

The Dialogue meeting on the SGR and the Nairobi Park illustrated the power of bringing together different stakeholders to share in finding a solution and committing to participating in the actions identified. This method can become a powerful tool towards promoting public participation, building consensus and mobilizing public support and ownership of any future government project. This will accelerate progress and significantly reduce the costs litigation.

Call on Japan to Ban Ivory Trade

WildlifeDirect recently became aware of the scale of laundering of illegal ivory in the ivory markets of Japan through its contact with the Japanese NGO Tears of the African Elephant. Please see more about the interview we did on NTV Wild via this link:https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Cvsj21F_FI4 . We have joined forces with other conservation organizations in Africa and Japan to take the opportunity provided by the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD) conference happening here in Nairobi, Kenya to publish a joint appeal to Japan to ban all trade in ivory trade, following the lead of China and the USA.

Japan is one of Africa’s most important development partners. They have made major contributions and commitments to support conservation. Now the conservation community call for 5 actions to be agreed at TICAD:

  1. Japan to permanently close legal domestic markets of ivory, and aggressively close down online trading sites that deal in ivory, all to crush demand.
  2. Japan to suspend ivory registration immediately, to prevent loopholes that allow fraudulent registration and laundering of illegal ivory.
  3. Japan to support the Elephant Protection Initiative.
  4. Japan to strengthen cooperation on elephant conservation initiatives and combating the trafficking of ivory to Japan through joint investigations and mutual legal assistance.
  5. Japan’s Prime Minister and First Lady to jointly issue statements to discourage the selling and buying of ivory in Japan and to initiate an education and outreach campaign to Japanese citizens on the importance of saving elephants by stopping poaching and ending ivory trade.

We urge Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta, who is the head of the Giants Club of African presidents supporting elephant conservation, and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinz? Abe, to seize this unique opportunity at TICAD6 to discuss the issue as part of their duty towards the development agendas of Africa and Japan.

We also urge the H.E. the First Lady of Japan, Akie Abe, an ardent conservationist, to join H.E. the First Lady of Kenya, Margaret Kenyatta in raising awareness about elephants and their conservation needs.

You can access the English and Japanese versions of the joint statement here: Joint Statement-TICAD6

 

 

 

 

Notorious Kenyan Ivory Trafficker Jailed for 20 Years and Fined USD 200,000

On Friday, a Mombasa law court sentenced Feisal Mohamed Ali to 20 years in jail after finding him guilty of illegal possession of ivory worth 44 million shillings (US $440,000). The court also imposed a fine of 20 million shillings.

This landmark ruling by the Kenyan court is the end of a long story that began with the seizure of 2 tonnes of ivory at Fuji Motors car yard in Mombasa in June 2014.

Read more about this story on The Guardian

Calling the World to help save African Elephants

 

African Elephants

 

WildlifeDirect supports the African Elephant Coalition (AEC) in the call to the world to help save African elephants.

As an organization that has been in the forefront calling for a total ban on all ivory trade, WildlifeDirect urges other African countries not represented at the meeting held in Montreux, Switzerland from 24 to 26 June 2016 to join AEC in this call to save the our iconic species that are in danger of extinction if nothing is done.

In a press release by AEC, 29 member states call on all governments, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations for their support, and calls on citizens around the world to ask their respective governments and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) representatives to support the five proposals and to help the Coalition in its mission to list all elephants in Appendix I.

The Coalition of 29 African member states submitted to CITES five proposals designed to reverse the poaching crisis facing elephants and to put an end to the ivory trade to afford elephants the highest protection under international law.

The five proposals are:

  1. Listing all elephants in CITES Appendix I
  1. Closure of domestic ivory markets
  1. Ivory stockpile destruction and management
  1. The Decision-Making Mechanism for a process of trade in ivory (DMM)
  1. Restricting trade in live elephants

AEC agreed to launch a social media campaign in a bid to gain support for the five proposals to the 17th Conference of the Parties (CoP17) of CITES in September-October in Johannesburg, South Africa. We invite you to use the hashtags #WorthMoreAlive, #EndIvoryTrade and #Vote4Elephants to support the campaign.

Speaking at the meeting in Montreux, Bourama Niagaté from Mali, a member of the Council of the Elders for the Coalition noted that there was need for all relevant stakeholders to pull together for the sake of Africa’s elephants.

Kenya, a member state of AEC has taken a zero tolerance approach to poaching and ivory trafficking.

In April this year, Kenya took a bold step in burning 105 tons of ivory and 1.5 tons of rhino horn. This is reportedly the world’s largest stockpile of elephant ivory and rhino horns ever to be burnt. The historic burn demonstrated Kenya’s commitment to seeking a total global ban of ivory and rhino horns.

Speaking at the burn, President Uhuru Kenyatta said, “by destroying ivory we declare once and for all that our national heritage is not for sale”. The only value that ivory has is tusks on a live elephant.

It is this commitment from the highest level of government and collaboration with conservationists and law enforcement that has seen Kenya achieve 80 percent reduction in deaths of elephants in the last three years.

 

You can download the Press Release Here

NTV Wild Talk: Season 1 & 2 Episodes

WildlifeDirect has partnered with Kenya Wildlife Service and NTV to bring you NTV Wild, a program that brings award winning documentaries on wildlife and also provides the platform for debate and discussion with experts on Kenya’s wildlife, its conservation and why it matters so much.

NTV Wild Talk S1 E1

“The mystery of Mzima”
Smriti Vidyarthi visits Mzima springs to bring a story about the spring that would be lifeless without hippos. A world class site that is amazing.

NTV Wild Talk S1 E2
“Kenya-US relations in protecting wildlife”
Smriti Vidyarthi engages US ambassador to Kenya Ambassador Robert F. Godec and the US Secretary – Interior Sally Jewell as #NTVWild talk focuses on US-Kenya relations in protecting our wildlife

NTV Wild Talk S1 E3
“Stopping wildlife trafficking through Kenya”
Smriti Vidyarthi takes a look at wildlife trafficking and wildlife crime.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCWvvfCad2U

TV Wild Talk S1 E4
“Saving Kenya’s big cats”
From the seventh wonder of the world, Maasai Mara is home to the largest population of lions. Smriti Vidyarthi share the incredible life stories of two cat families.

NTV Wild Talk S1 E5
“Safeguarding Karura Forest”
Smriti Vidyarthi takes a look at whether Karura forest is under threat or not. The show looks at the struggles to save Karura forest from land grabbers.

NTV Wild Talk S1 E6
“Wildlife Newbies & Champions”
Smriti Vidyarthi speaks to some of the new faces linked with protection of wildlife.


Read More »

#NTVWild Second Documentary – January 23

If you are in Kenya, Be sure to watch #NTVWild on Saturday January 23rd 2016

HERE BE DRAGONS…

embedded by Embedded Video
Download Video

 

 

 

 

NTV WILD Season Premiere on 16th January 2016

We are proud to announce the official premier of NTV Wild, a partnership between NTV one of Kenya’s premier broadcasters, WildlifeDirect and the Kenya Wildlife Service.

NTV Wild is a partnership between NTV, KWS and WildlifeDirect. The first ever broadcasting of the Award winning wildlife documentaries made in Kenya and Africa every Saturday.

We will awaken your sense of awe and wonder at our magnificent wildlife heritage, which you own and have a responsibility for protecting.

Help us save it. Visit our magnificent parks, and take actions against anything that threatens our protected areas, wildlife spectacles, wild landscapes and endangered species.

Tune in every Saturday (from the 16th of January) at 8 pm. Share this widely through your networks and on social media using the hasthag NTVWild
We look forward to your feed back

 

Strategies for success in the ivory war

Kenyans take to the streets in support of elephants and rhinos. Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, Nairobi, October 3rd, 2015. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

Kenyans take to the streets in support of elephants and rhinos. Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, Nairobi, October 3rd, 2015. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

 

Since 2013, according to the latest estimates, elephant deaths from poaching in Kenya are down by 80% and deaths of rhinos by 90%. This is a success story that deserves to be more widely known.

Kenya was traditionally in the forefront of wildlife conservation in Africa. However, in 2008 the sale of ivory from four southern African countries to China and Japan triggered an explosive demand and poaching erupted across the continent.

By 2012, the situation was almost out of control in Kenya due to corruption, ignorance, poor laws, and an inadequate anti-poaching response. Government agencies such as the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) were in denial.

I was among the many conservationists who felt angry and frustrated at the government’s refusal to respond to our concerns. One of our colleagues was arrested and others went into hiding for fear of being deported for exposing how serious the poaching crisis was.

The turning point came in February 2013 when the government finally agreed to call a special session of the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) to discuss wildlife conservation. This landmark meeting was attended by many dozens of representatives of ministries, law enforcement agencies, the private sector, academia and civil society.

It was a tough-talking meeting. We challenged the government’s complacent view of the situation and questioned the capacity and commitment of KWS and border agencies to control poaching and trafficking.

Leading Kenyan conservationists, including Iain Douglas-Hamilton, Agatha Juma and Jake Grieves Cook, warned that thousands of elephants were being killed each year and of the threat this posed to tourism and the economy

Representatives of the Ministry of Environment and Wildlife and KWS denied the situation was a crisis; however, they did ask the government for support to tackle the growing poaching problem.

Richard Leakey and I spoke for WildlifeDirect and we presented a 14 point plan of action that had been developed with barrister Shamini Jayanathan. After intensive discussions the NESC adopted most of our recommendations and instructed authorities to urgently adopt a ‘whole government’ response to the crisis.

The NESC meeting was the first major effort of the Hands Off Our Elephants campaign, which was officially launched five months later. Our aims were simple: to bring all sectors of society on board in order to defeat the poachers and traffickers, safeguard elephant populations, and turn Kenya into model for successful wildlife conservation.

The First Lady of Kenya, Her Excellency Margaret Kenyatta (centre with hat) in her role as Patron of the campaign “Hands Off Our Elephants”, launched in 2013. The marchers are accompanying Jim Nyamu (in the beige t-shirt) on part of his walk across Kenya to raise awareness about poaching. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

The First Lady of Kenya, Her Excellency Margaret Kenyatta (centre with hat) in her role as Patron of the campaign “Hands Off Our Elephants”, launched in 2013. The marchers are accompanying Jim Nyamu (in the beige t-shirt) on part of his walk across Kenya to raise awareness about poaching. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

Our initiative was coolly received in some quarters. Government officials accused us of being unpatriotic by damaging Kenya’s reputation abroad. Some fellow conservationists said we were being too ambitious.

We knew it would be difficult but we were confident that our aims were achievable, for three reasons:

  • Kenya has a vibrant civil society and a free press, so we would have the means to get our message across.
  • We had support in high places. The new President Uhuru Kenyatta, who took up office in April 2013, was known to be sympathetic to wildlife conservation. His wife, Margaret Kenyatta joined the campaign from the outset as its patron.
  • Kenya had done it before, in the 1990s, when KWS routed the poachers under the leadership of Richard Leakey, and President Daniel Arap Moi transformed global attitudes towards ivory by burning Kenya’s ivory stockpile.

Seven strategies for success

Looking back at what Hands Off Our Elephants has achieved so far, in an informal ‘mid-term evaluation’, I can identify seven things that have worked:

1. An evidence based approach. In making our case, we knew it would be not enough to rely on hearsay. We presented the results of 5 years of courtroom monitoring to prove that those arrested for wildlife crimes were being let off scot free or at most with derisory fines. We demanded – and got – an audit of Kenya’s ivory stockpile, overseen by independent observers.

Paula Kahumbu handing over the "Scoping study on the prosecution of wildlife related crimes in Kenyan courts" on behalf of WildlifeDirect to the Chief Justice Willy Mutunga in January 2014.
Paula Kahumbu handing over the “Scoping study on the prosecution of wildlife related crimes in Kenyan courts” on behalf of WildlifeDirect to the Chief Justice Willy Mutunga in January 2014. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

 

2. Mobilizing public support. We took our campaign into government offices and corporate board rooms, onto the streets and into schools and universities, and into the villages in areas that have elephants. We spoke to young people in language they would understand, with the support of pop stars, comic book authors, and sports personalities. In alliance with private sector, we took the message into supermarkets and onto airplanes.

This broad-based alliance has succeeded in generating a level of popular support for wildlife conservation never before witnessed in Kenya, or any other elephant range state.

Poster produced for the Ndovu music contest, featuring Kenyan hip hop artist Juliani. The contest invited young East Africans to use their musical talents to create a winning song for elephants.
Poster produced for the Ndovu music contest, featuring Kenyan hip hop artist Juliani. The contest invited young East Africans to use their musical talents to create a winning song for elephants. Illustration: WildlifeDirect

3. Mainstream media coverage. Our campaign transformed poaching from a wildlife conservation issue to headline news. Conservationists gave extensive TV interviews in prime-time current affairs slots, with the focus squarely on political, juridical and institutional capacity issues.

If you are reading this in Europe or North America, you might like to ask yourself when wildlife conservation was last given this treatment by media in your own country.

4. Political will. We were fortunate in this respect. In his inaugural address President Kenyatta signalled his intentions by referring to poaching as ‘economic sabotage’, and followed this up with a series of key measures to strengthen the law and the judiciary.

The First Lady, Her Excellency Margaret Kenyatta, made it clear that she intended to take an even more proactive role. She agreed to be Patron of Hands Off Our Elephants and has been a central figure in the campaign ever since.

Cabinet Secretary Judi Wakhungu of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources has been behind us all the way, as have US and British ambassadors Bob Godec and Christian Turner. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has convened meetings to create awareness of the problem amongst all Kenya-based diplomats.

 US Ambassador Robert Godec with school children from Nairobi on a visit to Amboseli National Park. World Elephant Day, 12 August 2015
US Ambassador Robert Godec with school children from Nairobi on a visit to Amboseli National Park. World Elephant Day, 12 August 2015. Photograph: WildlifeDirect
""

5. Boots on the ground. One of President Kenyatta’s first acts was to announce additional funds to finance anti-poaching activities, allowing the recruitment of 577 more rangers. He created a specialised multi-agency anti-poaching unit and brought all law enforcement agencies together to tackle the ivory trafficking problem in a coordinated way.

As a result, poachers are more likely to be caught than ever before. But we knew that this would have no deterrent effect unless getting arrested led to some serious consequences. That’s why the next two success factors were key.

6. Strengthening the law. Wildlife law before 2013 treated poaching as a petty offence. Maximum penalties were derisory compared to the vast profits that were being made by organised wildlife crime. We lobbied with many other NGOs and citizen groups for a new Wildlife Act.

The new act finally came into force in January 2104, making poaching and ivory trafficking a serious crime in Kenya, on a par with gun running and drug trafficking. Penalties for wildlife crime in Kenya are now the harshest in the world, including life imprisonment in some cases.

7. Reforms to the criminal justice system. Our courtroom monitoring program had exposed major challenges in record keeping, evidence collection, and prosecutions. The handling of wildlife trials has been transformed through the creation of a specialised wildlife crime prosecution unit under the office of the Public Prosecutor, combined with new operating procedures and extensive training programmes for legal staff.

Being arrested for poaching or ivory trafficking in Kenya has become a big deal.

Measures of success

Summarising the results of my mid-term evaluation: Kenya has managed to turn around the poaching crisis in a remarkably short time. This is in large part thanks to the support of NGOs – large and small – working with the private sector, government, and the donor community. All Kenyans can be proud of this impressive achievement.

Maryanne Njoroge of the Cooperative Bank of Kenya with its newly adopted baby Elephant, 'Mbegu', at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Centre, during a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) day for bank staff organised by WildlifeDirect in October 2014. The bank donated 150,000 Kenyan Shillings to the campaign "Hands Off Our Elephants".
Maryanne Njoroge of the Cooperative Bank of Kenya with its newly adopted baby Elephant, ‘Mbegu’, at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Centre, during a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) day for bank staff organised by WildlifeDirect in October 2014. The bank donated 150,000 Kenyan Shillings to the campaign “Hands Off Our Elephants”. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

Several poachers have gone to jail for life, and many have been fined hundreds of thousands of US Dollars. Jailing of convicted poachers is up from 4 to 11%. Suspected traffickers have had their assets seized and bank accounts frozen, as the law on proceeds of organized crime can now be applied to wildlife crimes.

Poachers are giving up the trade because of the high likelihood of arrest, and the knowledge that it will lead to prosecution and a jail sentence. This is reflected in the dramatic decline in poaching: the ‘bottom line’ that is the most important indicator of the success of our campaign.

Perhaps most importantly, for the first time in Kenya’s its history, Kenya is prosecuting major ivory traffickers. One of the most notorious suspected traffickers, Feisal Mohamed Ali, was arrested with the support of Interpol following the seizure of huge haul of ivory in Mombasa. He has remained behind bars to face trial since December 2014.

Newspaper advert placed by WildlifeDirect in Kenyan dailies following an announcement by Interpol that Feisal Mohamed Ali was on its 'most wanted' list for wildlife crimes.
Newspaper advert placed by WildlifeDirect in Kenyan dailies following an announcement by Interpol that Feisal Mohamed Ali was on its ‘most wanted’ list for wildlife crimes. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

The continuing threat

While Kenya can celebrate success today, we cannot be complacent. Just next door in Tanzania thousands of elephants are being gunned down annually and their population has been reduced by over 60 percent in just 5 years. Meanwhile in South Africa, over a thousand rhinos are murdered for their horns each year.

These killing fields will expand back into Kenya without concerted international efforts to reduce demand for ivory and rhino horn.

In Kenya, several factors threaten the sustainability of our successes. By far the most serious of these is the pervasive corruption that disfigures Kenyan society. It seems that corruption is rarely out of the news these days: it threatens the democracy that is bedrock of all our achievements so far.

The power of corrupt money is undoubtedly the reason why, in contrast to the harsh sentences imposed on poachers – the small fry – and despite the arrest of Feisal Mohamed Ali, no trafficker has yet been convicted and sent to jail under the new law.

The way forward

Children making model elephants at an event organised by "Hands Off Our Elephants". The campaign works to ensure that elephants will be part of these children's future, and their children's.
Children making model elephants at an event organised by “Hands Off Our Elephants”. The campaign works to ensure that elephants will be part of these children’s future, and their children’s. Photograph: WildlifeDirect

So what comes next? Hands Off Our Elephants will continue to expand its operations in Kenya while coordinating with partners across Africa to replicate our efforts in neighbouring countries. The campaign will focus on key new demands, including:

  • Corruption should be included among the named charges for wildlife offenders and in cases where police and customs officers, and other government officials are involved.
  • Existing high level cases should be brought to a rapid conclusion. Every delay increases the opportunities for evidence to be ‘lost’ and witnesses to ‘disappear’.
  • The must be an end the practice of deporting foreign nationals arrested for ivory trafficking. They should be tried in Kenyan courts. Traffickers should know that if they are caught with ivory at a Kenyan port or airport they can expect to spend the rest of their lives in a Kenya jail.
  • Visitors to Kenya and those in transit must be made aware of the new law and the penalties for poaching in order to reduce demand.
  • Kenya’s must destroy its entire ivory stockpile as a signal to the world that no Kenyan ivory will ever again enter into legal or illegal markets.

Above all, there is a need to strengthen accountability by giving civil society a permanent role in monitoring living and dead animals, seizures of illegal wildlife products, and the government’s response to wildlife crime.

The good news is that the foundations for this have been laid by the campaign itself, which has given rise to unprecedented levels of collaboration between government and civil society.

In recognition of the key importance of civil society organisations for wildlife conservation, NGOs have recently come together to form the “Conservation Alliance of Kenya”, a permanent stakeholder forum which will advise government on environmental issues. One of the key thematic groups that has been set up will address wildlife crime.

Thus democracy is not only the rock on which we build our campaigns. The campaigns themselves are an integral part of wider efforts to strengthen democracy.

Our African-led initiative to save elephants and wildlife is driven by a wider vision of an inclusive, prosperous African future; an Africa with effective governance and a vibrant civil society, and proud of its rich natural and cultural heritage.

 http://www.theguardian.com/environment/africa-wild/2015/nov/16/strategies-for-success-in-the-ivory-war

 
// g?c=a+f+c:(g+=f.length,f=a.indexOf("&",g),c=0<=f?a.substring(0,g)+c+a.substring(f):a.substring(0,g)+c)}return 2E3<c.length?void 0!==d?p(a,b,d,void 0,e):a:c};var ca=function(){var a=/[&\?]exk=([^& ]+)/.exec(q.location.href);return a&&2==a.length?a[1]:null};var r=function(a,b){this.width=a;this.height=b};r.prototype.round=function(){this.width=Math.round(this.width);this.height=Math.round(this.height);return this};var da=function(a,b){for(var c in a)Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(a,c)&&b.call(void 0,a[c],c,a)},fa=function(){var a=ea;if(!a)return"";var b=/.*[&#?]google_debug(=[^&]*)?(&.*)?$/;try{var c=b.exec(decodeURIComponent(a));if(c)return c[1]&&1<c[1].length?c[1].substring(1):"true"}catch(d){}return""};var ga=function(a,b,c,d){a.addEventListener?a.addEventListener(b,c,d||!1):a.attachEvent&&a.attachEvent("on"+b,c)};var ha=function(a){var b="";da(a,function(a,d){if(0===a||a)b+="&"+d+"="+encodeURIComponent(String(a))});return b},ia=function(a,b,c){a.google_image_requests||(a.google_image_requests=[]);var d=a.document.createElement("img");if(c){var e=function(a){c(a);a=e;d.removeEventListener?d.removeEventListener("load",a,!1):d.detachEvent&&d.detachEvent("onload",a);a=e;d.removeEventListener?d.removeEventListener("error",a,!1):d.detachEvent&&d.detachEvent("onerror",a)};ga(d,"load",e);ga(d,"error",e)}d.src=b;a.google_image_requests.push(d)};var ja=function(a,b,c){this.v=a;this.u=b;this.c=c;this.f=null;this.s=this.g;this.A=!1},ka=function(a,b,c){this.message=a;this.fileName=b||"";this.lineNumber=c||-1},ma=function(a,b,c){var d;try{d=c()}catch(g){var e=a.c;try{var f=la(g),e=a.s.call(a,b,f,void 0,void 0)}catch(l){a.g("pAR",l)}if(!e)throw g;}finally{}return d},t=function(a,b){var c=na;return function(){var d=arguments;return ma(c,a,function(){return b.apply(void 0,d)})}};ja.prototype.g=function(a,b,c,d,e){var f={};f.context=a;b instanceof ka||(b=la(b));f.msg=b.message.substring(0,512);b.fileName&&(f.file=b.fileName);0<b.lineNumber&&(f.line=b.lineNumber.toString());a=h.document;f.url=a.URL.substring(0,512);f.ref=a.referrer.substring(0,512);if(this.f)try{this.f(f)}catch(l){}if(d)try{d(f)}catch(l){}d=this.v;try{if((this.A?d.w:Math.random())<(c||d.o)){var g=d.m+(e||this.u)+ha(f),g=g.substring(0,2E3);ia(h,g)}}catch(l){}return this.c};var la=function(a){var b=a.toString();a.name&&-1==b.indexOf(a.name)&&(b+=": "+a.name);a.message&&-1==b.indexOf(a.message)&&(b+=": "+a.message);if(a.stack){var c=a.stack,d=b;try{-1==c.indexOf(d)&&(c=d+"\n"+c);for(var e;c!=e;)e=c,c=c.replace(/((https?:\/..*\/)[^\/:]*:\d+(?:.|\n)*)\2/,"$1");b=c.replace(/\n */g,"\n")}catch(f){b=d}}return new ka(b,a.fileName,a.lineNumber)};var oa=String.prototype.trim?function(a){return a.trim()}:function(a){return a.replace(/^[\s\xa0]+|[\s\xa0]+$/g,"")},pa=function(a,b){return ab?1:0};var qa=Array.prototype.indexOf?function(a,b,c){return Array.prototype.indexOf.call(a,b,c)}:function(a,b,c){c=null==c?0:0>c?Math.max(0,a.length+c):c;if(k(a))return k(b)&&1==b.length?a.indexOf(b,c):-1;for(;c<a.length;c++)if(c in a&&a[c]===b)return c;return-1},ra=Array.prototype.map?function(a,b,c){return Array.prototype.map.call(a,b,c)}:function(a,b,c){for(var d=a.length,e=Array(d),f=k(a)?a.split(""):a,g=0;gparseFloat(a))?String(b):a}(),Da={},A=function(a){var b;if(!(b=Da[a])){b=0;for(var c=oa(String(Ca)).split("."),d=oa(String(a)).split("."),e=Math.max(c.length,d.length),f=0;0==b&&f<e;f++){var g=c[f]||"",l=d[f]||"",V=RegExp("(\\d*)(\\D*)","g"),u=RegExp("(\\d*)(\\D*)","g");do{var M=V.exec(g)||["","",""],N=u.exec(l)||["","",""];if(0==M[0].length&&0==N[0].length)break;b=pa(0==M[1].length?0:parseInt(M[1],10),0==N[1].length?0:parseInt(N[1],10))||pa(0==M[2].length,0==N[2].length)||pa(M[2],N[2])}while(0==b)}b=Da[a]=0<=b}return b},Ea=h.document,Fa=Ea&&y?Ba()||("CSS1Compat"==Ea.compatMode?parseInt(Ca,10):5):void 0;!z&&!y||y&&9<=Fa||z&&A("1.9.1");y&&A("9");var B=document,q=window;var C=null;function D(a){return"function"==typeof encodeURIComponent?encodeURIComponent(a):escape(a)}var E=function(a,b){ia(a,b,void 0)},Ga=function(){if(!B.body)return!1;if(!C){var a=B.createElement("iframe");a.style.display="none";a.id="anonIframe";C=a;B.body.appendChild(a)}return!0},Ha={};var na;na=new ja(new function(){this.m="http"+("http:"==q.location.protocol?"":"s")+"://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/gen_204?id=";this.o=.01;this.w=Math.random()},"jserror",!0);var F=function(a,b){return t(a,b)};y&&A("9");!za||A("528");z&&A("1.9b")||y&&A("8")||xa&&A("9.5")||za&&A("528");z&&!A("8")||y&&A("9");var Ia=function(a,b,c){if("array"==aa(b))for(var d=0;d<b.length;d++)Ia(a,String(b[d]),c);else null!=b&&c.push("&",a,""===b?"":"=",encodeURIComponent(String(b)))},Ja=function(a,b,c){for(c=c||0;c<b.length;c+=2)Ia(b[c],b[c+1],a);return a},Ka=function(a,b){var c=2==arguments.length?Ja([a],arguments[1],0):Ja([a],arguments,1);if(c[1]){var d=c[0],e=d.indexOf("#");0e?c[1]="?":e==d.length-1&&(c[1]=void 0)}return c.join("")};var La=0,G={},Na=function(a){var b=G.imageLoadingEnabled;if(null!=b)a(b);else{var c=!1;Ma(function(b,e){delete G[e];c||(c=!0,null!=G.imageLoadingEnabled||(G.imageLoadingEnabled=b),a(b))})}},Ma=function(a){var b=new Image,c,d=""+La++;G[d]=b;b.onload=function(){clearTimeout(c);a(!0,d)};c=setTimeout(function(){a(!1,d)},300);b.src="data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAP///wAAACH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw=="},Oa=function(a){if(a){var b=document.createElement("OBJECT");b.data=a;b.width=1;b.height=1;b.style.visibility="hidden";var c=""+La++;G[c]=b;b.onload=b.onerror=function(){delete G[c]};document.body.appendChild(b)}},Pa=function(a){if(a){var b=new Image,c=""+La++;G[c]=b;b.onload=b.onerror=function(){delete G[c]};b.src=a}},Qa=function(a){Na(function(b){b?Pa(a):Oa(a)})};var Ra={l:"ud=1",j:"ts=0",B:"sc=1",h:"gz=1",i:"op=1"};if(B&&B.URL){var ea=B.URL,Sa=!(ea&&0=b)){var d=0,e=function(){a();d++;db;){try{if(c.google_osd_static_frame)return c}catch(d){}try{if(c.aswift_0&&(!a||c.aswift_0.google_osd_static_frame))return c.aswift_0}catch(d){}b++;c=c!=c.parent?c.parent:null}return null},Ya=function(a,b,c,d,e){if(10<Wa)q.clearInterval(Va);else if(++Wa,q.postMessage&&(b.b||b.a)){var f=Xa(!0);if(f){var g={};J(b,g);g[0]="goog_request_monitoring";g[6]=a;g[16]=c;d&&d.length&&(g[17]=d.join(","));e&&(g[19]=e);try{var l=L(g);f.postMessage(l,"*")}catch(V){}}}},Za=function(a){var b=Xa(!1),c=!b;!b&&q&&(b=q.parent);if(b&&b.postMessage)try{b.postMessage(a,"*"),c&&q.postMessage(a,"*")}catch(d){}};var O=!1,$a=function(a){if(a=a.match(/[\d]+/g))a.length=3};(function(){if(navigator.plugins&&navigator.plugins.length){var a=navigator.plugins["Shockwave Flash"];if(a&&(O=!0,a.description)){$a(a.description);return}if(navigator.plugins["Shockwave Flash 2.0"]){O=!0;return}}if(navigator.mimeTypes&&navigator.mimeTypes.length&&(O=(a=navigator.mimeTypes["application/x-shockwave-flash"])&&a.enabledPlugin)){$a(a.enabledPlugin.description);return}try{var b=new ActiveXObject("ShockwaveFlash.ShockwaveFlash.7");O=!0;$a(b.GetVariable("$version"));return}catch(c){}try{b=new ActiveXObject("ShockwaveFlash.ShockwaveFlash.6");O=!0;return}catch(c){}try{b=new ActiveXObject("ShockwaveFlash.ShockwaveFlash"),O=!0,$a(b.GetVariable("$version"))}catch(c){}})();var ab=w("Firefox"),bb=wa()||w("iPod"),cb=w("iPad"),db=w("Android")&&!(va()||w("Firefox")||x()||w("Silk")),eb=va(),fb=w("Safari")&&!(va()||w("Coast")||x()||w("Edge")||w("Silk")||w("Android"))&&!(wa()||w("iPad")||w("iPod"));var P=function(a){return(a=a.exec(v))?a[1]:""};(function(){if(ab)return P(/Firefox\/([0-9.]+)/);if(y||ya||xa)return Ca;if(eb)return P(/Chrome\/([0-9.]+)/);if(fb&&!(wa()||w("iPad")||w("iPod")))return P(/Version\/([0-9.]+)/);if(bb||cb){var a;if(a=/Version\/(\S+).*Mobile\/(\S+)/.exec(v))return a[1]+"."+a[2]}else if(db)return(a=P(/Android\s+([0-9.]+)/))?a:P(/Version\/([0-9.]+)/);return""})();var hb=function(){var a=q.parent&&q.parent!=q,b=a&&0<="//tpc.googlesyndication.com".indexOf(q.location.host);if(a&&q.name&&0==q.name.indexOf("google_ads_iframe")||b){var c;a=q||q;try{var d;if(a.document&&!a.document.body)d=new r(-1,-1);else{var e=(a||window).document,f="CSS1Compat"==e.compatMode?e.documentElement:e.body;d=(new r(f.clientWidth,f.clientHeight)).round()}c=d}catch(g){c=new r(-12245933,-12245933)}return gb(c)}c=q.document.getElementsByTagName("SCRIPT");return 0<c.length&&(c=c[c.length-1],c.parentElement&&c.parentElement.id&&0<c.parentElement.id.indexOf("_ad_container"))?gb(void 0,c.parentElement):null},gb=function(a,b){var c=ib("IMG",a,b);return c||(c=ib("IFRAME",a,b))?c:(c=ib("OBJECT",a,b))?c:null},ib=function(a,b,c){var d=document;c=c||d;d=a&&"*"!=a?a.toUpperCase():"";c=c.querySelectorAll&&c.querySelector&&d?c.querySelectorAll(d+""):c.getElementsByTagName(d||"*");for(d=0;d<c.length;d++){var e=c[d];if("OBJECT"==a)a:{var f=e.getAttribute("height");if(null!=f&&0<f&&0==e.clientHeight)for(var f=e.children,g=0;g<f.length;g++){var l=f[g];if("OBJECT"==l.nodeName||"EMBED"==l.nodeName){e=l;break a}}}f=e.clientHeight;g=e.clientWidth;if(l=b)l=new r(g,f),l=Math.abs(b.width-l.width)<.1*b.width&&Math.abs(b.height-l.height)<.1*b.height;if(l||!b&&10<f&&10<g)return e}return null};var jb,Q=0,R="",S=!1,T=!1,U=!1,kb=!0,lb=!1,mb=!1,nb=!1,ob=!1,pb=!1,qb="",rb=0,sb=0,W=0,tb=[],K=null,ub="",vb=[],wb=null,xb=[],yb=!1,zb="",Ab="",Bb=(new Date).getTime(),Cb=!1,Db="",Eb=!1,Fb=["1","0","3"],X=0,Y=0,Gb=0,Hb="",Jb=function(a,b,c){S&&(kb||3!=(c||3)||nb)&&Ib(a,b,!0);if(U||T&&mb)Ib(a,b),T=U=!1},Kb=function(){var a=wb;return a?2!=a():!0},Ib=function(a,b,c){(b=b||ub)&&!yb&&(2==Y||c)&&Kb()&&(b=Lb(b,c),lb?Qa(b):E(a,b),pb=!0,c?S=!1:yb=!0)},Lb=function(a,b){var c;c=b?"osdim":U?"osd2":"osdtos";var d=["//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/activeview","?id=",c];"osd2"==c&&T&&mb&&d.push("&ts=1");R&&d.push("&avi=",R);jb&&d.push("&cid=",jb);d.push("&ti=1");d.push("&",a);d.push("&uc="+Gb);Cb?d.push("&tgt="+Db):d.push("&tgt=nf");d.push("&cl="+(Eb?1:0));""!=qb&&(d.push("&lop=1"),c=m()-rb,d.push("&tslp="+c));d=d.join("");for(c=0;c<vb.length;c++){try{var e=vb[c]()}catch(g){}var f="max_length";2<=e.length&&(3==e.length&&(f=e[2]),d=p(d,D(e[0]),D(e[1]),f))}2E3<d.length&&(d=d.substring(0,2E3));return d},Z=function(a,b){if(zb){try{var c=p(zb,"vi",a);Ga()&&E(C.contentWindow,c)}catch(e){}0<=qa(Fb,a)&&(zb="");var c=b||ub,d;d=p("//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/gen_204?id=sldb","avi",R);d=p(d,"vi",a);c&&(d+="&"+c);try{E(q,d)}catch(e){}}},Mb=function(){Z("-1")},Ob=function(a){if(a&&a.data&&k(a.data)){var b;var c=a.data;if(k(c)){b={};for(var c=c.split("\n"),d=0;d=e)){var f=Number(c[d].substr(0,e)),e=c[d].substr(e+1);switch(f){case 5:case 8:case 11:case 15:case 16:case 18:e="true"==e;break;case 4:case 7:case 6:case 14:case 20:case 21:case 22:case 23:e=Number(e);break;case 3:case 19:if("function"==aa(decodeURIComponent))try{e=decodeURIComponent(e)}catch(l){throw Error("Error: URI malformed: "+e);}break;case 17:e=ra(decodeURIComponent(e).split(","),Number)}b[f]=e}}b=b[0]?b:null}else b=null;if(b&&(c=new I(b[4],b[12]),K&&K.match(c))){for(c=0;cX&&!T&&2==Y&&Pb(q,"osd2","hs="+X)},Rb=function(){var a={};J(K,a);a[0]="goog_dom_content_loaded";var b=L(a);try{Ta(function(){Za(b)},10,"osd_listener::ldcl_int")}catch(c){}},Sb=function(){var a={};J(K,a);a[0]="goog_creative_loaded";var b=L(a);Ta(function(){Za(b)},10,"osd_listener::lcel_int");Eb=!0},Tb=function(a){if(k(a)){a=a.split("&");for(var b=a.length-1;0<=b;b–){var c=a[b],d=Ra;c==d.l?(kb=!1,a.splice(b,1)):c==d.h?(W=1,a.splice(b,1)):c==d.j?(T=!1,a.splice(b,1)):c==d.i&&(lb=!0,a.splice(b,1))}Hb=a.join("&")}},Ub=function(){if(!Cb){var a=hb();a&&(Cb=!0,Db=a.tagName,a.complete||a.naturalWidth?Sb():H(a,"load",Sb,"osd_listener::creative_load"))}};n("osdlfm",F("osd_listener::init",function(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,l,V){Q=a;zb=b;Ab=d;S=f;jb=V;g&&Tb(g);T=f;1==l?tb.push(947190538):2==l?tb.push(947190541):3==l&&tb.push(947190542);K=new I(e,ca());H(q,"load",Mb,"osd_listener::load");H(q,"message",Ob,"osd_listener::message");R=c||"";H(q,"unload",Qb,"osd_listener::unload");var u=q.document;!u.readyState||"complete"!=u.readyState&&"loaded"!=u.readyState?("msie"in Ha?Ha.msie:Ha.msie=-1!=navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase().indexOf("msie"))&&!window.opera?H(u,"readystatechange",function(){"complete"!=u.readyState&&"loaded"!=u.readyState||Rb()},"osd_listener::rsc"):H(u,"DOMContentLoaded",Rb,"osd_listener::dcl"):Rb();-1==Q?Y=f?3:1:-2==Q?Y=3:0